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Posts Tagged ‘Hungary’

The EU’s Weakest Link Moves Closer to Breaking

Posted by Larry Doyle on January 4th, 2012 8:16 PM |

When I write of “the EU’s weakest link”, to which country do you think I refer?

Must be Greece, right? Maybe not.

Italy? Nope, not them either.

Portugal? Ireland? Spain? No, no, no!!

I first wrote of The Weakest Link in early 2009.  I highlighted the fact that this “weakest link” moved to nationalize its pension system in late 2010 in this commentary.

Enough of the suspense. Which nation do I believe is the EU’s weakest link?  (more…)

Hungary To Nationalize Pension Funds: “This is Open Blackmail”

Posted by Larry Doyle on November 29th, 2010 7:34 PM |

Might Uncle Sam try to take control of our retirement assets?

“What’s that, LD? Lose control of our retirement assets?”  That is, could the “grand ol’ man” unilaterally swap our retirement assets for government sponsored IOUs?

This past January, a regular reader of Sense on Cents provided us a Blueprint for Government Takeover of IRAs. In February, I interviewed Ron Holland regarding his report, “Plan Now to Escape Obama’s Retirement Trap.”

Many readers of the aforementioned commentary and listeners to the aforementioned interview were blown away by the mere thought that our government may possibly look to nationalize our individual retirement assets and accounts. Argentina implemented such a drastic policy but certainly not the United States, right? Do not be so sure.

Would any other nations dare go to these lengths? Well, thanks to our supporter Comrade Joe for bringing a new development to light in this corner of our economic landscape. How so? (more…)

Let’s Revisit Europe: The Weakest Link

Posted by Larry Doyle on March 17th, 2009 5:15 AM |

I thank our loyal reader in Michigan, Mr. Fiscal Liberal, for sharing with us a piece written by Simon Johnson, the former chief economist of the International Monetary Fund, a professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management, and a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics.

Mr. Johnson writes about the growing problems in Europe. I am hard pressed to see how the European situation, both in the East and West, can not end badly. There are too many economies that are effectively insolvent or on the brink of insolvency. I believe this is the region of the world which will experience increased economic strife leading to social unrest and political change. Can the problems in Europe be contained given the massively interconnected world of global finance? 

Thank you again FL for sharing this very enlightening piece from Simon Johnson!!   

G-20s Real Agenda Should be Saving Europe from Itself
By Simon Johnson
Last Updated: 10:28AM GMT 16 Mar 2009

The media coverage of the G20 finance ministers meeting this weekend was dominated by the apparent battle between those who support more fiscal stimulus and those who want to impose more regulations on the financial system.

This, we are led to believe, is the big debate facing the full G20 heads of government summit early next month: the US is pushing for a bigger global fiscal stimulus (2pc extra government spending from everyone, to be monitored by the IMF), while the continental Europeans are holding out for greater regulation. Gordon Brown is trying hard to cast himself as the broker for any apparent deal.   (more…)

Why is George Soros Short the Euro? MUST READ!

Posted by Larry Doyle on March 3rd, 2009 6:10 AM |

In very short order, I have gained a deep respect and regard for our Economic All-Star, John Mauldin. I have come to appreciate that Mauldin and I view the market through the same lens focused on the global economy. While many media outlets focus on the day to day, if not hour to hour trading activity, I believe they are truly missing the forest for the trees.

While I have written twice over the last week about eastern Europe being the weakest link in the world of global finance, Mauldin and his colleague Niels Jensen of Absolute Return Partners provided insights and analysis that is numbing.

Why is George Soros short the euro? Let me provide a synopsis of Mauldin’s and Jensen’s “Europe On the Ropes.” Assuming those visiting Sense on Cents have an interest in the markets and economy, this piece is somewhat lengthy, but a MUST READ!! A link is provided at the end of my review. (more…)

The Weakest Link is Weakening

Posted by Larry Doyle on March 2nd, 2009 6:00 AM |

The other day I highlighted the fact that 12 eastern European countries would solicit a bailout from the European Union over the weekend in Brussels. I defined this bloc of eastern European countries as currently the Weakest Link in the global economy. Well, if they were the weakest link then they just got weaker as they were rebuffed in their request for aid.

The dynamic at work in the weekend’s emergency meeting held in Brussels is a play on beggar-thy-neighbor policies implemented during times of economic stress.

There are actually a number of factors influencing the European Union’s refusal to provide bailout money to these eastern European nations. Included in these factors are the following: (more…)

The Weakest Link

Posted by Larry Doyle on February 27th, 2009 10:45 AM |

It is widely believed that the weakest link in the global economy centers on Eastern Europe. In light of that, the leaders of 12 eastern European countries are holding an emergency economic summit this weekend. From that summit, it is expected that these countries will request an international bailout.

 As of now it appears the countries in greatest degree of stress are Hungary, Ukraine, and Serbia. The expectation is that the group of countries will request the European Union to arrange a $230 billion bailout package. Who would provide the funding? A conglomerate of European Central Banks, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, European Investment Bank, and European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.

A major issue for eastern Europe is that their creditors, largely western European banks along with western European countries, are not exactly in great shape themselves. These countries may look to accelerate their entry into the EU and the full adoption of the Euro along with it.

As the pressure and stress builds, the chance of political dislocation also grows.   

For further details on how Hungary Seeks $230 Billion Bailout for Eastern Europe.  I will be monitoring this situation as it develops.  As our global economy is very much interconnected, the increase in sovereign credit risks is a very serious concern. 

LD






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