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Posts Tagged ‘future of America’

America’s Future Is Dark Unless…

Posted by Larry Doyle on May 4th, 2010 9:28 AM |

Land of the free, home of the brave.

No doubt, the United States of America is the greatest nation on the face of the earth. I love my country. I love hearing the stories of immigrants from all parts of the world who have come here to make a better life. Even though there is current concern around our immigration policy (or lack thereof), there exist endless numbers of stories of people making real sacrifice and, in turn, real progress for their families. I am inspired by these stories.

Despite all our greatness, I am extremely concerned that our nation will erode from within unless there is serious change in one very large corner of our political and economic landscape. What is it? (more…)

The Case for Student Vouchers

Posted by Larry Doyle on February 8th, 2010 2:00 PM |

Who would not make an investment that can generate a 20% better return at half the overall cost? The appeal of this investment is that it pays increasing dividends in the future. Are you interested? You should be because your tax dollars are being spent at an ever increasing rate to fund a lower returning investment at a higher cost, without the benefits of future dividends but the reality of higher social costs.

I am referring to my major interest in the use of student vouchers for the funding of secondary education. Time and again I come across stories of urban families who are desperate to get their children well educated in hopes of moving on to a better life. These hopes are evidenced by the overwhelming demand for admission to a charter school or access to a student voucher.

Regrettably, the teachers’ unions in our country maintain a stranglehold on the futures of many of our urban youth. How so? The unions’ support for the Democratic Party comes with the price tag of limiting both charter schools and the use of vouchers. What a shame! (more…)

The Future of America

Posted by Larry Doyle on May 29th, 2009 2:19 PM |

On this historic day in which the government of the United States of America is on the doorstep of taking a majority equity stake in General Motors, I thought it may be prudent to address manufacturing in America.

To that end, former Clinton administration Secretary of Labor Robert Reich provides highly insightful commentary at Wall Street Pit: The Future of Manufacturing, GM, and American Workers (part I).

As we wonder what the future of our automotive manufacturing industry may look like as well as manufacturing in general, I strongly recommend we take Reich’s words to heart. Let’s take a round trip as we review the dynamics of the Industrial Revolution and the road ahead:

What’s the Administration’s specific aim in bailing out GM? I’ll give you my theory later.

For now, though, some background. First and most broadly, it doesn’t make sense for America to try to maintain or enlarge manufacturing as a portion of the economy. Even if the U.S. were to seal its borders and bar any manufactured goods from coming in from abroad–something I don’t recommend–we’d still be losing manufacturing jobs. That’s mainly because of technology.

When we think of manufacturing jobs, we tend to imagine old-time assembly lines populated by millions of blue-collar workers who had well-paying jobs with good benefits. But that picture no longer describes most manufacturing. I recently toured a U.S. factory containing two employees and 400 computerized robots.
The two live people sat in front of computer screens and instructed the robots. In a few years this factory won’t have a single employee on site, except for an occasional visiting technician who repairs and upgrades the robots.

Factory jobs are vanishing all over the world. Even China is losing them. The Chinese are doing more manufacturing than ever, but they’re also becoming far more efficient at it. They’ve shuttered most of the old state-run factories. Their new factories are chock full of automated and computerized machines. As a result, they don’t need as many manufacturing workers as before.

Economists at Alliance Capital Management took a look at employment trends in twenty large economies and found that between 1995 and 2002–before the asset bubble and subsequent bust–twenty-two million manufacturing jobs disappeared. The United States wasn’t even the biggest loser. We lost about 11% of our manufacturing jobs in that period, but the Japanese lost 16% of theirs. Even developing nations lost factory jobs: Brazil suffered a 20% decline, and China had a 15% drop.

I’m fairly certain this message is not one commonly promoted by our media. I believe we strictly hear how our manufacturing jobs are purely shipped overseas and especially to developing countries. (more…)






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