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Posts Tagged ‘CNBC’

Trading Volumes Plummet, “Choose Not To Play”

Posted by Larry Doyle on March 9th, 2012 8:58 AM |

“The problem here is, when the public becomes aware of the nature of the game, they may choose not to play. This is the problem not only for Goldman but for Wall Street as a whole if people choose not to play.”  

I made that statement in the midst of an interview two years ago with CNBC’s Mark Haines (may he rest in eternal peace) about Goldman Sachs. (For those interested you can access that interview here. My comments about Goldman specifically and this topic begin around the 3 minute mark.)

What have trading volumes done on the NYSE over the last two years?  (more…)

CNBC Appearance This Afternoon at 2:40pm >>> UPDATED with Video

Posted by Larry Doyle on November 24th, 2010 10:44 AM |

***Update: video clip included below

If you’ve got some time this afternoon, please check in to CNBC’s Street Signs at 2:40pm as I will be discussing the recent insider trading probe and the implications it has on our markets.

Hopefully, I’ll be able to grab a video clip of the segment to post later today or tomorrow.

Larry Doyle

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I have no affiliation or business interest with any entity referenced in this commentary. As President of Greenwich Investment Management, an SEC regulated privately held registered investment adviser, I am merely a proponent of real transparency within our markets so that investor confidence and investor protection can be achieved.

What We Learned from the May 6th Market Plunge

Posted by Larry Doyle on May 11th, 2010 7:55 AM |

Like leading sheep to the wolves, the manner in which high frequency trading activity has grown to dominate our equity markets is nothing more than a trap. How has that trap worked? Stay on message and continue to promote the premise that high frequency trading adds liquidity to the market. Time and time again, America would hear from quantitative traders and their analysts engaged in high frequency trading that these programs would provide consistent liquidity from which retail investors would benefit.

What a crock!! That said, the HFT activity itself is not to blame for the market plunge. The programs behaved as they were designed. That is, during periods of extreme volatility, those running the programs would simply shut down the machine. Is that liquidity? No, I don’t think so.

Never again should America have to listen to anybody engaged in high frequency trading and hear them say these systems provide liquidity to the market. They don’t. (more…)






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