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Archive for the ‘12th Street Capital’ Category

12th Street Capital Provides Perspective on the Foreclosure Fiasco

Posted by Larry Doyle on October 22nd, 2010 11:23 AM |

What the hell is truly going on within the entire mortgage foreclosure fiasco? There are seemingly more angles to this mess than there ever were choices of mortgage products themselves. Where can we turn to make some ‘sense’ of this madness? Let’s check in with the crowd on the cutting edge of this sinkhole, that is our friends at 12th Street Capital. Today they write,

Not surprisingly the ones that look to be best positioned during this mortgage foreclosure/put back fiasco are the lawyers. As reported by HousingWire.com late yesterday, “A spokesperson for the New York law firm Quinn, Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan confirmed to HousingWire it has been hired by the Federal Housing Finance Agency, a move some say means the government-sponsored enterprises are going after bad mortgages it bought from originators.” Guess what, the GSEs have ALWAYS pursued repurchases. (more…)

12th Street Capital Prescient re: Mortgage Fraud

Posted by Larry Doyle on January 12th, 2010 3:33 PM |

Last August, our friends at 12th Street Capital highlighted the strong likelihood of increased mortgage fraud by brokers originating loans with FHA insurance. In my piece “Fair and Fraudulent Mortgage Lending,” I referenced the stellar work and perspectives provided by KD and his 12th Street team. I wrote:

Where can one go to receive a fair deal in the process of getting mortgage financing? What parts of the mortgage market may represent the next wave of fraud? Which firms may currently be involved in these frauds?

Major “high five” to KD and our friends at 12th Street Capital for providing tremendous perspectives on these topics this morning. KD writes:

From the Fair Mortgage Collaborative website . . .

The Fair Mortgage Collaborative is a nonprofit membership organization whose members are individually and collectively committed to providing low and moderate income and minority homeowners and homebuyers access to mortgages with the consumers’ best interests at its core, at a fair rate of compensation. Our approaches and standards work for all homeowners and homebuyers.

KD’s comment: “While I certainly applaud their effort, I would make the friendly suggestion they should be looking at FHA lenders and Reverse Mortgage lenders in particular . . . for those are the bastions of future (and current) abuses.”

What do we learn today, five months later? The Wall Street Journal reports on a number of mortgage firms being subpoenaed for the very activities highlighted by 12th Street last August. (more…)

Retaining Risk on Wall Street: Necessary but Painful

Posted by Larry Doyle on November 5th, 2009 1:03 PM |

How did Wall Street lead the United States economy into the ditch?

The pure ‘originate to distribute’ model employed on Wall Street spelled the death knell for Wall Street and our economy.

I addressed how firms won under that originate to distribute model in a commentary from November 12, 2008, “The Wall Street Model Is Broken….and Won’t Soon Be Fixed!!”:

At the turn of the century, the Wall Street model was a pure “originate to distribute” model with little to no residual risk on behalf of the originators or underwriters. When there is no residual risk, those who “WIN” are the players that can purely process the most volume. Well, how does one get volume? Lower the credit standards, put fewer restrictions on borrowers, little to no covenants (NINA Loans: no income, no asset check). WOW!!! What were we thinking?? Well, Wall St. felt, “let’s worry about it tomorrow or maybe not at all because we are making too much money today.”

Tomorrow has arrived and Wall Street must now deal with the concept of retaining risk in their loan originations. The topic of ‘risk retention’ has been bandied about over the course of the year, but it was ratcheted up dramatically in a recent meeting of the House Financial Services Committee and U.S. Treasury on October 27th.

What came out of that meeting has potentially dramatic implications for the entire spectrum of loan origination, securitization, and distribution businesses on Wall Street and their subsequent impact on Main Street. Let’s navigate. (more…)

12th Street Capital Reviews FASB 166 and 167 and Tells Us Why Wall Street Will Need More Capital

Posted by Larry Doyle on November 4th, 2009 12:00 PM |

Money makes the world go round. Right now the world is not going around all that well because there is neither sufficient capital nor sufficient demand for capital from a global standpoint. That said, profits and bonuses are back on Wall Street so they must have sufficient capital, right? Not so fast.

While our wizards in Washington and on Wall Street are projecting an image of ‘come on in, the water’s fine,’ a crowd based in Norwalk, Connecticut has plans that hold major implications for our markets and economy. What crowd is this? The Financial Accounting Standards Board, otherwise known as FASB.

Recall that last spring Congress, supported by a heavy influence from Wall Street, rammed through a relaxation of the FASB’s accounting rule requiring fair value mark-to-market accounting. Regardless of what you think of that  legislation, I think there is no doubt that the change allowed banks to mismark a wide array of assets and forestall losses.  The need for the accounting rule change could be and will be debated ad nauseum. I believe the powers that be at FASB felt emasculated in the process.

Fast forward and let’s review the next major piece of accounting legislation emanating from FASB. That being FASB 166 and 167.  I will admit I am no accountant, but I understand enough about the markets and accounting to know that the implementation of these rules, scheduled to go into effect in January of 2010 (in November 2009 for certain institutions depending on their fiscal calendar), will likely have a major impact on a wide array of financial institutions. (more…)






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