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Posts Tagged ‘what brought down Wall Street’

Hank Paulson: The Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing

Posted by Larry Doyle on April 9th, 2013 10:07 AM |

Have you ever encountered an individual who seems to be so ingratiating that you are immediately attracted to him and desire to learn more of what he has to offer?

I would imagine that many who frequent this blog have been in meetings or other situations where a strong willed, dynamic leader lays out a host of propositions that would have everybody in attendance salivating for more; however, once having set the table so to speak, the leader quickly and surreptitiously delivers a powerful message incorporating proposed enormous changes so as to leave all in attendance wondering “what just happened here.” This scenario is often compared to the children’s fable The Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing.

As I continue to navigate back through the annals of Wall Street while working on my book (In Bed with Wall Street to be released in early 2014 by Palgrave/MacMillan…sorry for the shameless plug) I recently came across testimony from then Goldman Sachs CEO Hank Paulson that struck me as a quintessential example of this aforementioned simple story of deceit.  (more…)

Proprietary Trading Did Bring Down Wall Street

Posted by Larry Doyle on February 3rd, 2010 12:37 PM |

The Wall Street lobby in all its glory is fighting tooth and nail to defend its turf from the volley launched by former Fed Chair Paul Volcker. Recall that the newly designated Volcker Rule, if implemented, would disallow proprietary activities from those institutions taking consumer deposits. This implementation would effectively reinstitute the Glass-Steagall Act which was rescinded in 1999.

The proprietary activities most often highlighted by those in the banking community are investment and trading activity within private equity, hedge fund and prop trading desks. The banks are screaming that these activities should not and need not be separated from their overall operations because these activities did not cause our economic crisis. They would be correct on one hand, but how convenient that their definition of proprietary is not truly comprehensive. How so? (more…)






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