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Posts Tagged ‘Wall Street campaign contributions’

The Fault Lies Not in Our Stars but in Ourselves

Posted by Larry Doyle on June 18th, 2009 11:24 AM |

Just as Cassius could not serve both Caesar and the republic, neither can our political leaders today serve two masters. Who are these masters? On the one hand, politicians claim to serve the public interest, while on the other the politicians are beholden to the big money showered upon them by lobbyists representing large financial interests.

Unless and until these conflicts are exposed and extirpated, in my humble opinion, our nation will never regain its stature. The evidence is overwhelming. The gall of the politicians is unending. The media is largely beholden to the same interests and enables the charade to continue.

The Wall Street Journal touches upon these issues in writing Hope vs. Financial Experience:

The main idea behind the Obama Administration’s new financial revamp is essentially this: With more power and a modest reshuffling of the bureaucratic furniture, the same regulators who missed the last credit mania will somehow prevent the next one. If nothing else, this concept is certainly true to President Obama’s campaign theme of “hope.”

From my experience, “hope” is always a lousy hedge. What do I mean? If I, in whatever role I occupy, am relying upon hope rather than thorough preparation, discipline, and ethics to achieve my desired goals, then I am in an unenviable position. As a nation, we occupy that unenviable position currently. Why?

We “hope” the financial system and reforms will serve our national interests. However, those charged with developing and implementing these reforms are conflicted. How so? They feed from the trough of those supposedly being regulated while supposedly representing the interests of the public, i.e. those they are supposed to be serving. No man can serve two masters.

President Obama and his Congressional colleagues from both sides of the aisle would promote the concept that our financial regulatory system had gaps which banks profitably penetrated. The promotion of that concept is pure pandering. Those gaps were created and paid for by the massive flow of lobbying dollars that went from Wall Street to Washington. In turn, the politicians hoped the gaps would not be detected or overly expensive. They “hoped” and we as a nation lost. Where is the acccountability?

Many would say there is much blame to go around for this financial crisis. However, if we do not call those in Washington on the carpet for their culpability in this turmoil, we are doomed to repeat it.

As I watch the Congressional testimony of Secretary Geithner this morning, my blood boils. Seeing the likes of Senators Chris Dodd, Chuck Schumer, and many others pretending to represent the national interest is very hard to swallow. Why?

All we need to do is review the names of those who facilitated the financial fraud that occurred at Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae. President Obama himself, in his short stint in the U.S. Senate, was a huge beneficiary of the largesse from Freddie and Fannie and the financial industry at large. Make no mistake, the intentional “cooking of the books” at both those agencies was fraudulent and criminal behavior. Washington enabled it and profited from it.

The WSJ addresses this very point in the process of reviewing Obama’s proposed regulatory reforms:

This “gaps and weaknesses” theory has the political benefit of ignoring the role that Washington played in creating the credit bubble. There’s not a word in the 85 pages about the Fed’s years of negative real interest rates, and the only mention of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac is a placeholder paragraph noting that reform of those housing giants will come later. Also nowhere in sight is any explanation for how the Fed, which had every power imaginable to regulate Citigroup, could have allowed Citi to sell tens of billions of dollars of off-balance-sheet mortgage products.

Thus, the debate in Washington will continue. I view that act as a mere sideshow to the main play going on behind the curtain. That “show” burdens the taxpayer, both now and in the future, with an enormous and unknown cost!!

LD

Dodd’s Production Run Is Way Down!!

Posted by Larry Doyle on April 1st, 2009 1:51 PM |

Any salesperson on Wall Street is always faced with the question as to the nature of his book of business. Meaning, not only what type of business he transacts but even more importantly, with whom does he do business. While there are many fabulous salespeople on Wall Street, sales managers are forever reviewing account coverage assignments. Given these account reviews and changes, I always maintained that there was not a lot of “security” in the securities business. Ultimately, a salesperson is only as good as his book, meaning the depth and breadth of relationships.

Putting a twist on this coverage model, it appears as if Senator Chris Dodd has a problem. Aside from pure partisan politics in the midst of an economic tsunami, Dodd’s personal relationships with many financial companies has run its course. I do not mean to say that Dodd and these individuals may not maintain an ongoing relationship, but the fact is a number of financial firms which supported Dodd over the years are either bankrupt, merged, or wards of the state. (Freddie, Fannie, AIG, Citi)

Bloomberg reports:

The Democrat has less than half the campaign cash he had at a comparable point in his last re-election bid, when he faced far fewer hurdles. Last year, he emptied an account built up largely through financial-company employees’ donations to pay for a presidential run; now, he has to replenish his coffers even as the firms his panel regulates struggle with losses and back away from their one-time champion turned critic.

(more…)

Kangaroo Court . . . MUST READ!!

Posted by Larry Doyle on March 19th, 2009 4:20 PM |

The kangaroo court on Capitol Hill just passed a bill to tax bonus payments at a 90% rate for employees (with family incomes in excess of $250,000) of AIG and other firms that received $5 billion or more in government bailouts.  In my opinion, kangaroo-courtthis piece of legislation is a poorly constructed means of recapturing government funds.

I have previously stated that firms which were truly bailed out by the government should be subject to strict government compensation controls. A number of firms – such as Northern Trust, JP Morgan, Wells Fargo, and Goldman Sachs – were compelled to take government funds. If employees of these firms are subject to this tax, it will be a travesty and injustice of unprecedented proportions. I believe that Congress is unknowingly escalating class warfare amidst a facade and charade of protecting the public. I believe we will see public outrage from employees at these firms (JP Morgan, Northern Trust, Goldman, Wells Fargo) that can only be rivaled by our forefathers back in the 1770s. This tax is another means of promoting the income redistribution upon which Obama ran his campaign. Taxation without representation is tyranny!!!  (more…)






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