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Posts Tagged ‘Morgan Stanley’

Tom Brown’s Dire Outlook for Banking

Posted by Larry Doyle on June 11th, 2012 11:04 AM |

Most market participants are understandably focused on immediate developments in the Euro-zone and the implications of the shell game being played over there for our domestic economy and markets.

From my perspective, the perpetual kicking of the can down the road in Europe and the variations thereof here in the U.S. portend little more than an ongoing slow-motion train wreck for our global economy.

While central bankers try desperately to keep the train on the tracks, the easy money flowing into the system does not come without very real costs. Ask savers and individuals trying to live on a fixed income what a 0% Fed Funds rate does for them. Who else is being negatively impacted? The banking industry at large.

Really, how is that?  (more…)

Oppenheimer: Do the Right Thing, Redeem Your Auction-Rate Securities

Posted by Larry Doyle on June 30th, 2010 5:14 PM |

Q: Which full-service brokerage firm has NOT redeemed their clients stuck in auction-rate securities for the past 28 months?

Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, Citigroup, Wachovia, Bank of America, Oppenheimer, TD Ameritrade, Fidelity, Merrill Lynch, UBS?

A: Oppenheimer & Company is the only one of these institutions that has not redeemed their private clients’ Auction-Rate Securities that were fraudulently marketed as “just like cash.”

OPPENHEIMER: DO THE RIGHT THING!!!

On behalf of auction-rate securities investors everywhere, I am happy to run this ad here at Sense on Cents!! This specific ad was submitted by a group of Oppenheimer clients.

LD

Goldman and AIG

Posted by Larry Doyle on March 21st, 2009 5:49 AM |

There has been extensive speculation that Goldman Sachs unjustifiably benefited from the weakness at AIG over the last 6 months. While conspiracy theorists can and will have a field day with this story, at its core I think Goldman did what any well run firm should always do — protect its shareholders.

While the stock values of Merrill Lynch, Morgan Stanley, and Bank of America flirted with total disaster, Goldman Sachs traded down but bottomed out at approximately $50 a share. That price does not strike me as indicative of a firm on the brink of bankruptcy. As Goldman now reveals, it had significant exposure to AIG but it also significantly hedged this exposure to AIG via other transactions. Thus, Goldman would have been negatively impacted by an AIG bankruptcy but not fatally impacted. (more…)






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