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Patriots Day in Boston: Oh the Memories

Posted by Larry Doyle on April 16, 2013 8:07 AM |

“Go get your brother.”

I fondly recall that statement from my Dad at 9am or thereabouts on Patriot’s Day circa 1971.

The adrenaline rushed through my body as I jumped on my bike for the mile ride to “the field” to get my brother so we could head into Fenway Park for the traditional Patriot’s Day 11am ballgame. I recall that our Red Sox were playing the Cleveland Indians that beautiful day.

I also remember wondering why my brother had to head to “the field” that morning, as time would be precious to get into Fenway and get tickets.

As fate would have it, when we arrived at Fenway around 10:45am, the ticket windows were closed. SOLD OUT. I was pissed at my brother thinking he had blown what would have been a great day by going to the field.

My Dad did not even humor my brother’s plea to climb up onto the catwalk of a billboard overlooking center field, as some Fenway fanatics were wont to do. A trip to a local shop for a hot dog and ice cream along with a little time spent watching some Marathon runners pass down Commonwealth Avenue did not alleviate the disappointment of not seeing the ballgame.

Patriot’s Day in Boston, Massachusetts is the best day of the year because it is about family, country, pride, spirit, and tradition. All of that was shattered yesterday. My heart and prayers go out to all of the people and families who were directly impacted by the hellacious acts of cowardice on display on Boylston Avenue shortly before 3pm yesterday afternoon. In my strong opinion, the attacks we witnessed yesterday were directly targeting the very virtues previously mentioned.

To think that any single individual or group might target youth and family members eagerly awaiting their friends and relatives to cross the finish line of the Boston Marathon is almost too hard to fathom. How does something like this happen? Regrettably, in a world of moral relativism, the presence of evil has not only gained a foothold but is strengthening. Yesterday’s attacks struck me as evil incarnate.

Are we willing to forego certain personal freedoms so as to root out the evil and protect our children and society at large? Although we can never fully guard against every act of evil and violence, this question strikes me as the central theme of the quandary facing our nation at this point in time and for the foreseeable future. I would welcome hearing what readers think.

As for the children who had their innocence stolen from them yesterday, let us not only say prayers for them and their families and the entire city of Boston (and our nation) but let’s fight for them as well.

Remember, as Edmund Burke so eloquently reminds us “All it takes for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing.”

Navigate accordingly.

Larry Doyle

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I have no business interest with any entity referenced in this commentary. The opinions expressed are my own. I am a proponent of real transparency within our markets so that investor confidence and investor protection can be achieved.

  • stanley

    Trying to make sense of this.

    How does something like this happen? Look no further than U.S. foreign policies of the past quarter century; we are now seen as global bullies, military aggressors acting in our own self interest, armed with a monetary policy that wreaks havoc in emerging economies.

    Why does something like this happen? Look no further than U.S. domestic policies of the past quarter century; a strong belief in God, family values, a sense of personal responsiblity and the virtues of non-discrimination have been replaced by central planning initiatives, sub-prime debt, the impacts of political diversity and devisiveness, a sense of entitlement.

    Maybe a deeper understanding of what occurred in Oklahoma City, NYC, Benghazi, Newtown and now Boston can help?

    What can we learn? How can we change?

    1) Be more vigilante. 2) Terrorism can happen to anyone anywhere. 3) The only reliable safety provided by public servants, politicians and policy initiatives is “after the fact” response. 4) Terrorist are now holding law abiding citizens responsible for the policies of their government. 5) The best in people is only brought out by the worst in people.

    I will never forget the images of the first responders yesterday, running to help those injured unconcerned for their own safety.

    I can only imagine the lifetime of grief that will be experienced by the father whose only mistake on Monday was running in the Boston Marathon; a moment of great pride and personal achievement turned into a lifetime of terror, his 8 year old son was killed, his 6 year old daughter’s leg was torn from her body, and his wife now in critical condition suffering massive brain injury.

    Keep hope alive.






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