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The True Spirit of Christmas, 2010

Posted by Larry Doyle on December 25, 2010 8:08 AM |

I firmly believe the greatest gift of all is the ‘giving of oneself.’ In giving, the donor receives so much in return: the beauty and grace of seeing a smile on the recipient’s face; the warmth of knowing that somebody has benefited from your generosity; the satisfaction that the world is a little better place from your giving.

I hope you are able to enjoy the beauty of this day with your loved ones. While many of us are truly blessed to be home with family today, let us also remember our brothers and sisters who are far away fighting to protect our freedom and liberties. I send this message primarily to them as well as all those who have returned from duty, especially our Wounded Warriors, and I say, “THANK YOU.”

On that note, I want to return to an authentic Christmas story which, I believe, captures the true spirit of Christmas.

This story made such an impact on me last year, it is only fitting to run it again.

Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Kwanza, or however you celebrate, Happy Holidays!!

A Christmas Tale — 1919, The Wall Street Journal, December 2008

By HANS VON SPAKOVSKY

It’s easy to complain in the midst of a stressful holiday season. But my family has a unique remedy: We remember one special Christmas in 1919 that gave us the freedom and liberty we enjoy today. This will be the 89th anniversary of the year my father celebrated Christmas Eve deep in the snow-laden woods of Russia as he fled the Communist takeover of his homeland.

When I tell people that my father was an officer in the White Army who fought the Bolsheviks in the Russian civil war, they usually look at me with disbelief, because I am only 49. But he married and started a family later in life, after he lived through both world wars.

He had been an officer in the Russian Army in World War I; after the Bolshevik putsch he ended up fighting against them in the far north of Russia. In 1919 he was close to the Arctic Circle in the port city of Arkhangelsk, where at the beginning of the year, six feet of snow fell and the temperature was regularly 30 degrees below zero.

The Allies — the English, Americans and French — had put military forces in Russia, including in Murmansk and Arkhangelsk, in 1918. When they withdrew in September 1919, the White Army forces faced dire peril: Their source of supplies, including arms, was gone. Many regular soldiers deserted en masse to the Bolsheviks.

As the situation deteriorated, my father and his unit were surrounded. They fought until very few supplies remained. By December, their commander told them that they would soon be unable to continue to fight and that the Bolsheviks had promised that surrendering White forces would be freed and sent home.

But my father knew that the communists shot the officers they captured. The only way he could escape was through the frozen White Sea on the lone icebreaker in the port, which was not large enough to evacuate everyone. Only a small number of high-ranking White Russian officers eventually fled that way.

One woman and 16 men, including my father, decided they would try to get out another way. In the middle of a very snowy night, they skied through the Bolshevik lines toward Finland. As my father later told his five children, it was an arduous and long journey. They had so little food that at one point they were reduced to eating the beeswax candles they carried with them.

They soon ceased to count the days. Time became amorphous as they traveled through the chilling cold of an Arctic winter in the darkness of the deep woods. Their singular goal was to avoid Bolshevik patrols.

On one of those timeless, dark days, my father said, the woman in their group reminded the men of something they had all lost track of — tomorrow would be Christmas Eve.

The next day they skied ’til the beams of the sun turned the treetops golden and the shadows in the forest became longer and longer. They stopped in a small glade for the night, and my father cut down a small fir. They placed some of their remaining candles on its branches and adorned it with blue ribbons cut from a blouse the woman had carried in her knapsack.

With the dark veil of night covering them, they lit the candles and their small pine became a Christmas tree. The scene seemed almost mystical to my father — 17 human beings sitting in the glow of a makeshift Christmas tree in the thicket of a primeval forest. They forgot about the frost of the northern wintry night, their exhaustion, and their anxiety about the future.

No more hatred remained in their hearts, my father told us — only love for God and men alike, friends and enemies. They said a prayer, sang some Christmas hymns, and then sat silently, thinking about what they had lost and were leaving behind, including their families. (My father never saw his mother or his father again.) The candles burned out, and it became dark again around them. (LD’s highlight)

The next day they resumed their journey. Once Christmas had passed, and they did not encounter any Bolshevik patrols, my father felt they had been saved. Two weeks later, they arrived safely in Finland. They had skied hundreds of kilometers through the wilderness in the dead of winter.

My father died in 1988, just short of his 93rd birthday. There is a lot more to his story — great drama, more danger, and adventures that he always said were better to recall as memories than to have lived through. He eventually immigrated to the United States with my mother, whom he met in 1946 in a refugee camp in occupied Germany.

So this Christmas, besides opening presents and singing carols, my family will observe one other tradition. We will drink a toast and give thanks to a man who fled a murderous, cruel dictatorship and gave us a gift more precious than anything else: the chance to grow up in freedom and to enjoy the liberty that is our birthright as Americans. Merry Christmas!

Mr. von Spakovsky is a visiting legal scholar at The Heritage Foundation and a former commissioner of the Federal Election Commission. He is a proud first-generation American.

If Mr. von Spakovsky’s story moved you as it did me, then “regift” it and send this story along to others.

Larry Doyle

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I have no affiliation or business interest with any entity referenced in this commentary. The opinions expressed are my own and not those of Greenwich Investment Management. As President of Greenwich Investment Management, an SEC regulated privately held registered investment adviser, I am merely a proponent of real transparency within our markets so that investor confidence and investor protection can be achieved.

  • Lou

    Absolutely beautiful!!

    Our nation and the world need more of where this came from…

    No more hatred remained in their hearts, my father told us — only love for God and men alike, friends and enemies. They said a prayer, sang some Christmas hymns, and then sat silently, thinking about what they had lost and were leaving behind, including their families. (My father never saw his mother or his father again.) The candles burned out, and it became dark again around them.

    Thank you for this story!!

  • Nicolas

    Dear Larry,

    Thank you for all your gifts.

    Merry Christmas!

  • disenchanted

    I too have this story in my background. Upon turning 16, my great grandfather was going to be taken into the Bolshevik army. His mother would have no part of that. Besides my grandfather, there were 7 siblings. He was the oldest. His family planned with others in the same circumstances and fled Russia on foot, somehow making their way to France and freedom. My great Aunt, the youngest, told us how my great grandfather carried her on his shoulders while they walked. She told us how, as it was told to her, people would stop them to give them food and water, or shelter at night, hide them from the army. From France my family got to the United States and I was born here in freedom. Thank you Grandpa Dear and your mother.

  • Mark J. Novitsky

    WHERE is the DOJ in pursuing CRIMINAL investigations of BP, Massey Mining, any number of pharmaceuticals…as far as the “untouchable” banksters??? What about documented lies of Paulson, Bernanke, Giethner, Schapiro??? – Or BUSH / CHENEY for War Crimes & Torture and outing a federal agent? – What motivates the AG is going after WIKILEAKS for exposing Govt. Fraud and Corruption…THIS get immediate attention.






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