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Roubini: “How to Avoid Double Dip Global Recession”

Posted by Larry Doyle on June 15, 2010 5:05 PM |

I need to make a point, on a more regular basis, of visiting my Sense on Cents link to Project Syndicate. This site provides a virtual treasure trove of fabulous writers and insightful global perspectives. For example, widely read and renowned economist Nouriel Roubini offers what policymakers should do in writing, How to Avoid a Double-Dip Recession:

First, in countries where early fiscal austerity is necessary to prevent a fiscal crisis, monetary policy should be much easier – via lower policy rates and more quantitative easing – to compensate for the recessionary and deflationary effects of fiscal tightening. In general, near-zero policy rates should be maintained in most advanced economies to support the economic recovery.

Second, countries where bond-market vigilantes have not yet awakened – the US, the UK, and Japan – should maintain their fiscal stimulus while designing credible fiscal consolidation plans to be implemented later over the medium term.

Third, over-saving countries like China and emerging Asia, Germany, and Japan should implement policies that reduce their savings and current-account surpluses. Specifically, China and emerging Asia should implement reforms that reduce the need for precautionary savings and let their currencies appreciate; Germany should maintain its fiscal stimulus and extend it into 2011, rather than starting its ill-conceived fiscal austerity now; and Japan should pursue measures to reduce its current-account surplus and stimulate real incomes and consumption.

Fourth, countries with current-account surpluses should let their undervalued currencies appreciate, while the ECB should follow an easier monetary policy that accommodates a gradual further weakening of the euro to restore competiveness and growth in the eurozone.

Fifth, in countries where private-sector deleveraging is very rapid via a fall in private consumption and private investment, the fiscal stimulus should be maintained and extended, as long as financial markets do not perceive those deficits as unsustainable.

Sixth, while regulatory reform that increases the liquidity and capital ratios for financial institutions is necessary, those higher ratios should be phased in gradually to prevent a further worsening of the credit crunch.

Seventh, in countries where private and public debt levels are unsustainable – household debt in countries where the housing boom has gone bust and debts of governments, like Greece’s, that suffer from insolvency rather just illiquidity – should be restructured and reduced to prevent a severe debt deflation and contraction of spending.

Finally, the International Monetary Fund, the European Union, and other multilateral institutions should provide generous lender-of-last-resort support in order to prevent a severe deflationary recession in countries that need private and public deleveraging.

In general, deleveraging by households, governments, and financial institutions should be gradual – and supported by currency weakening – if we are to avoid a double-dip recession and a worsening of deflation. Countries that can still afford fiscal stimulus and need to reduce their savings and increase spending should contribute to the global current-account adjustment – via currency adjustments and expenditure increases – in order to prevent a global shortage of aggregate demand.

Failure to implement such coordinated policy measures – to sustain global aggregate demand at a time when deflationary trends are still severe in advanced economies – could lead to a very dangerous and damaging double-dip recession in advanced economies. Such an outcome would cause another bout of severe systemic risk in global financial markets, trigger a series of contagious sovereign defaults, and severely damage the growth prospects of emerging-market economies that have so far experienced a more robust recovery than advanced countries.

At this stage of our global economic crisis, can the nations of the world navigate their own economic paths in an unselfish manner while considering the needs and realities of their global partners? Or, will the Prisoners Dilemma prevent nations from thinking globally and all nations suffer collectively as a result?

….and miles to go before we sleep.

LD

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  • Mark

    Chances of all these things happening? Slim and less than that.

    Does Roubini really think China will allow their currency to appreciate or promote consumption?

    Maintaining fiscal stimulus and deficit controls do not exactly go hand in hand.

    Not sure if Roubini is trying to curry favor with those who believe he is strictly a doom and gloom guy or if he is merely highlighting how impossible it will be to avert a double dip?

  • Thanks for mentioning Project Syndicate for people like me who are late to the party. It looks like a must read site.






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