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Wall Street Wisdom: Andrew Lanyi

Posted by Larry Doyle on August 7, 2009 4:23 PM |

Wall Street as an industry is very easily vilified. I panned it myself the other day. That said, there are a lot of great people on Wall Street just as there are great people in every industry.

On that note, I was moved by a story in this morning’s Wall Street Journal: A Survivor of Nazi Brutality Who Ascended Wall Street.

The individual profiled, Andrew Lanyi, clearly had a unique outlook on life and Wall Street. I am particularly impressed by his discipline, mentoring, and wisdom.

Do yourself the favor of reading this piece. Savor Mr. Lanyi’s life story like a fine wine. There are rich lessons here for all of us.

LD

  • Sunnybearandpud

    I sure wish I could have the oppurtunity to have known him personally. It is individuals such as Mr. Lanyi that you can sit and listen to words of wisdom and want to learn form. It is an individual that you want your children to listen to. He will missed in this world!

    • karen

      I did have the honor of knowing andrew lanyi. he was one of a kind. Absolutely broke the mold with him. May he rest in peace.

      • paul lanyi

        he was my dad and yes, they broke the mold. dead serious about his work, but also a “character” in every sense of the word.

        • Larry Doyle

          Paul,

          I extend my sympathies to you and your entire family. I was truly moved upon reading about your Dad and his life story.

          While not having known your Dad, his story is truly inspirational. I know it inspired me, and will offer further inspiration thinking about it in the future.

          The world clearly could use more like him.

          • Daniel Polizzi

            Hey Paul, I doubt you remember me, I worked with your dad from Feb 2001 to October of 2002. We lost touch after CIBC sold Oppenheimer and I’ve thought of him often. He was always kind to me, yet stern. He never had time for BS and I never gave him any thus we got along. I often thought of him. I recently spoke to a former collegue and talked about reaching out to him but regreatfully never did. I always thought it would be cool to go out to meet him at his hampton retreat, sip lemonade and hear his Wall Street stories. He had a ton and they were always good (in ever sense of the word) and I am glad I got to hear some of them. I heard about the funeral too late to attend so please accept my sincere condolences and pass the same along to Diane.
            I’ve quoted your dad many times since I left his tutolage. He was a mentor in every word. I remember trying to build my business and him coming over with a book stating “there are pearls of wisdom here, read it”. Two days later I would find a 3×5 on my desk stating “AL would like to know what you thought of the book”, a job with book reports ..lol. Yet he was always right.
            I wished I would of kept in touch, I really do.
            I hope he is in a better place and you and I both know, where ever he is, he is looking for an angle among the angels after all “What everyone knows isn’t worth knowing”.
            I read in the WSJ article that
            “Guests are encouraged to wear primary colors or bright clothing in memory of Andrew’s colorful style of dressing”.
            Coincidentally the day I read it I was wearing an obnoxiously bright pink polo at the office(my color choices are often a topic of discussion). I remember looking at your dad’s style and thinking “only someone confident and successful can pull off those colors”. As you see part of him will always be with me, he was a good man and an even better friend and mentor.
            Again please accept my sincere condolences.

        • Daniel Polizzi

          August 11, 2009 at 11:21 pm
          Hey Paul, I doubt you remember me, I worked with your dad from Feb 2001 to October of 2002. We lost touch after CIBC sold Oppenheimer and I’ve thought of him often. He was always kind to me, yet stern. He never had time for BS and I never gave him any thus we got along. I often thought of him. I recently spoke to a former collegue and talked about reaching out to him but regreatfully never did. I always thought it would be cool to go out to meet him at his hampton retreat, sip lemonade and hear his Wall Street stories. He had a ton and they were always good (in ever sense of the word) and I am glad I got to hear some of them. I heard about the funeral too late to attend so please accept my sincere condolences and pass the same along to Diane.
          I’ve quoted your dad many times since I left his tutolage. He was a mentor in every word. I remember trying to build my business and him coming over with a book stating “there are pearls of wisdom here, read it”. Two days later I would find a 3×5 on my desk stating “AL would like to know what you thought of the book”, a job with book reports ..lol. Yet he was always right.
          I wished I would of kept in touch, I really do.
          I hope he is in a better place and you and I both know, where ever he is, he is looking for an angle among the angels after all “What everyone knows isn’t worth knowing”.
          I read in the WSJ article that
          “Guests are encouraged to wear primary colors or bright clothing in memory of Andrew’s colorful style of dressing”.
          Coincidentally the day I read it I was wearing an obnoxiously bright pink polo at the office(my color choices are often a topic of discussion). I remember looking at your dad’s style and thinking “only someone confident and successful can pull off those colors”. As you see part of him will always be with me, he was a good man and an even better friend and mentor.
          Again please accept my sincere condolences.






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