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Where Can I Put My Money?

Posted by Larry Doyle on March 11, 2009 5:06 PM |

With stock markets down 15-20% on the year and 50% over the last 14 months, everybody in the market is asking the same question, “where can I put my money?” While many asset managers are touting the equity markets as a great buy at these levels, cooler and calmer heads are stating that the economy and markets are likely to have a slow recovery. The question screams where to put one’s money to earn more than the pittance offered in bank checking and savings accounts.

I read a very informative piece in today’s WSJ, Locking In Returns You Like. First off, this piece is very user friendly. It provides a wealth of information and links to websites which will provide good market insight.

Over and above referencing some quality products (GNMAs, TIPS, municipals), it also broaches the topic of  laddering which I believe is a very valuable technique in building a bond portfolio.

Additionally, the article highlights FPA New Income Fund which is managed by one of our Economic All-Stars Bob Rodriguez. (I have no professional relationship with anybody on this site!!)

I think you will find this article a very valuable resource and I would recommend putting it in the “save” column for future reference. As you review the products highlighted and topics broached, please do not hesitate to ask anything you may not fully understand.

LD

  • Had enough

    What happened? Banks borrowed money from lenders around the world. The bankers then kept a big chunk of that money for themselves, calling it “management fees” or “performance bonuses.” Once the investments were exposed as hopeless, the lenders — ordinary savers, foreign countries, other banks, you name it — were repaid with government bailouts.

    In effect, the bankers had siphoned off this bailout money
    in advance, years before the government had spent it.
    This form of moral hazard — when profits are privatized and losses are socialized — certainly played a role in creating the current mess.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/11/business/economy/11leonhardt.html?_r=2&ref=business






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