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Posts Tagged ‘fundamental analysis’

Reason to Be Concerned About the Market

Posted by Larry Doyle on July 6th, 2011 8:12 AM |

It is a well known fact that an increasing percentage of daily trading volume in the equity markets is driven by high frequency traders. Whether you think that is a good or bad development is currently irrelevant. It is a reality.

That reality has clearly changed the nature of investing and assessing the markets.

How does one invest with a long term horizon when so much of the market is driven by short term traders? Very carefully.

Long term investing requires a solid understanding of fundamental analysis. In the midst of that endeavor, though, investors might want to have an appreciation for technical analysis, which can be utilized across an array of time segments but is very often applied for shorter time periods. (more…)

“You’re Playing with Sharks”

Posted by Larry Doyle on July 22nd, 2010 6:20 AM |

Is it safe to go in the water? In other words, is it safe to play in the markets under the current construct? Do small retail investors truly stand a chance against the ‘big boys’ on Wall Street running high powered algorithmic trading programs and assorted other high frequency trading mechanisms? Are fundamental traders being thrown around amidst the ‘high waves’ and ‘strong surf’ pounding the shore?

No doubt, the scene on Wall Street has changed dramatically over the years. The onslaught of high frequency trading complete with a wide array of ‘bait and tackle’ such as flash orders, dark pools, naked access, co-location, and much more make it extremely challenging — if not downright daunting — for those who believe they can navigate these waters with simple ‘rod and reel.’ (more…)

Mere Pawns in Financial Chess Match

Posted by Larry Doyle on June 15th, 2009 6:51 PM |

The equity markets were down approximately 2% today without any overwhelming economic news. The news we did receive was decidedly mixed.

On the bearish side of the ledger, a measure of manufacturing activity in New York declined and confidence amongst homebuilders also declined. On the bullish side, the IMF announced that it is raising its 2009 forecast for economic activity in the United States. Taken together, those statistics would not typically generate a 2% downward move. So what happened?

Please recall from my posts “Greater Fool Theory and “What’s Driving the Market” that I believe the market is being driven by technical analysis and flows to a much greater extent than fundamental strength. Did we have any meaningful developments during the day or over the weekend to impact the technical support for our markets? I’m glad you asked. As Bloomberg reports, U.S., Global Stocks Drop as MSCI Falls Most in 2 Months:

Europe’s Dow Jones Stoxx 600 Index lost 2.5 percent after Group of Eight finance ministers, who met in Italy over the weekend, began drawing up contingency plans for rolling back budget deficits and bank bailouts as the economy shows signs of recovery and investors start worrying about inflation.

Recall that technical support is predicated strictly on new flows of cash entering the market to provide support and push prices to higher levels. There is no real fundamental analysis that supports these flows. While some economists may believe there are hints of global economic recovery, those debates are ongoing. The fact is, much like in a “shell game,” when a dealer (like a government) gives a hint that he plans on pulling some chips off the table, other players will do the same.

That line of reasoning developed at the G-8 conference and carried over into the market. Why did the G-8 express concerns about deficits and bailouts and inflation? Very simply, when interest rates move higher by 1% over the course of 6-8 weeks, they are sending a strong signal that there is a problem brewing. Even Dallas Fed governor Richard Fisher acknowledges that the Fed can only do so much to support the massive deficit spending and fiscal deficits. Bloomberg reports, Fisher Says Fed Can’t Offset Treasury-Borrowing Flood:

The Federal Reserve isn’t capable of offsetting the “flood” of U.S. Treasury borrowing with its bond-purchase program, which is helping to revive credit markets, Dallas district-bank President Richard Fisher said.

“The program has had its impact,” Fisher said today in an interview with Bloomberg Television. “At the same time, you cannot counter this enormous flood” of borrowing “coming from the United States Treasury.”

The Fed’s efforts to stimulate the economy are complicated by rising Treasury yields, which push up the cost of mortgages even after policy makers have lowered short-term interest rates near zero.

On the one hand, G-8 ministers are indicating the need to pull in their fiscal reins. On the other hand, Fed governor Fisher is indicating the Fed can’t support Treasury borrowing singlehandedly.

Do you get the sense we are all mere pawns in this massive game of financial chess going on around us?

LD

Is The Market Overbought?

Posted by Larry Doyle on April 1st, 2009 9:55 PM |

A few weeks ago, I wrote a piece on whether the market was oversold. Allow me to re-introduce a few topics . . .

The market valuation of any asset is determined by three factors:

1. Fundamentals: measures items such as cash flow analysis, cost-benefit analysis, earnings before interest, taxes and depreciation (EBITDA)

2. Technicals: measured by regression of price movements to determine overbought and oversold conditions

3. Psychology: measured by unscientific surveys of market participants

And now the update:

1st quarter earnings are due out over the next few weeks. Most analysts and managers I follow believe these earnings will be lower than expectations and that 4th quarter 2008 earnings will be revised lower. Will companies provide guidance going forward? Many companies have refrained given the economic uncertainty. (more…)

Fibonacci Retracements

Posted by Larry Doyle on March 6th, 2009 12:40 PM |

I am going to assume that for the general public, the term Fibonacci Retracements is not part of the normal vocabulary. In helping people navigate the economic landscape, allow me to introduce you to a basic Wall Street practice utilized by many traders. Every investor can benefit from a basic understanding of this concept.

Major market indices trade based on fundamental analysis (cash flow, asset/liability, earnings ), technical analysis (price regressions), and psychology (measure of bullishness vs bearishness). Our friend Fibonacci falls into the technical analysis camp. I do not want to get overly involved in the arcane aspects of this concept, but it can be very useful in assessing market levels and market directions. (more…)

Is The Market Oversold?

Posted by Larry Doyle on February 25th, 2009 2:40 PM |

The valuation of any asset is determined by three factors:

1. Fundamentals: measures items such as cash flow analysis, cost-benefit analysis, earnings before interest, taxes and depreciation (EBITDA)

2. Technicals: measured by regression of price movements to determine overbought and oversold conditions

3. Psychology: measured by unscientific surveys of market participants

I have never seen such divergent views on expected future earnings which directly impacts any reasonable fundamental analysis. (more…)






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